Digesting the FSMA Animal Food Rule

Sponsored by the Agricultural and Food Law Consortium

Topic:john dillard

Congress ordered sweeping changes to a number of sectors of the food industry by enacting the Food Safety Modernization Act.  Now, after years of rulemaking, training, and a good bit of confusion, the FSMA rules are upon us.  While much of the attention devoted to the FSMA rules has centered around the human food and produce-specific rules, the rules also have a substantial impact on the pet food and livestock and poultry feed industries.  Large pet food and feed manufacturers are already facing compliance requirements for CGMPs; the much more onerous preventive controls kick in this fall.

This presentation may be useful for agribusiness professionals, producers, lenders, legal practitioners, academic faculty, and extension personnel that have an interest in learning more about the FSMA animal food rule and how it will impact the feed and pet food industry.  The presentation will summarize the two primary components of the FSMA animal food rule – Current Good Manufacturing Practice & Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls.

Participation:

This webinar was recorded on March 15, 2017.  To listen to a recording of the webinar, please click here.

Presenter:

John Dillard, Associate, Olsson Frank Weeds Terman Matz PC

John Dillard is an attorney with Olsson Frank Weeda Terman Matz PC (OFW Law) in Washington, DC.  He focuses his practice on food and agricultural clients on matters ranging from litigation, regulatory compliance, food safety, and antitrust.  John has an extensive hands-on and educational background in production agriculture and agribusiness, and also writes a monthly column on legal and policy issues for Farm Journal. John represents several clients in the animal food industry.  Further, he has also completed the Preventive Controls Qualified Individual Lead Instructor training.

Research & Materials:

Memo Re: FSMA Animal Rule – Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-Based Preventive Controls